Filming Dracula in the 1960s and the JayRich group, Annesley


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David Amos, Project officer for the HLF funded Annesley Old Church project and a Full Circle supporter, has sent us this post:
We had a fantastic day on Monday (10th December 2012) when a small group of us met at the Acacia Centre in Annesley Woodhouse to view the archive footage of the spoof Dracula films done by the Jayrich Group in the early 1960’s.  vlcsnap-2012-12-12-13h38m41s222In attendance were Mrs and Eddie Newby (Dracula in the film, 86 years young!), Fred Hutchinson (member of the Kirkby Cine Club in the 1960’s), Trevor Lee (Local Film and Media Historian), Mick Pattison (Local film and media enthusiast) and David Amos (Project Officer for the Annesley Old Church Project). 
Eddie Newby was interviewed about the making of the two spoof Dracula films and then the footage from the two films was shown and filmed, with the group discussing various aspects of the making the films over 50 years ago.  Trevor Lee supplied research details of the Jayrich group and Fred Hutchinson brought a collection of vintage movie camera’s.
 
vlcsnap-2012-12-12-13h39m16s62MACE’s Full Circle project made digital copies of the cine films and now preserve the original at the MACE film archive. Plans are in the initial stages for using the footage from the original films in a new production as part of the Annesley Old Church Project (2011-2014).  The Annesley project is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and some of the original footage was filmed at Annesley Old Church when it was more intact than the present ruined remains. To find out about the Annesley Church project have a look at his link: http://www.ournottinghamshire.org.uk/page_id__406_path__0p31p33p167p.aspx
 
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Spotlight on our Full Circle Film Depositors – Art Zarb


Art Zarb in his projection room

We thought it was time to feature some of our talented film makers who have made the Full Circle project such an interesting project to work on. They have not only enriched the film archive with their home movies, but built a rich portrait of midland life.

Art’s cinema

Art hails from Malta originally and came to the midlands at a very early age. He developed an interest in photography and worked as a professional photographer for most of his life. He also worked as a professional cinema projectionist, handling large 35mm reels of film and working on the latest technology in cinema projection equipment.

Art worked as a professional cinema projectionist

You can see the size of some of the reels of film he worked with in the photo on the right. He soon become interested in film making and made many films of life in the clubs where he worked as a photographer, family life and holidays. In fact Art developed such an interest in making and screening films that he built a cinema in his back garden. Some of the celebs from the 1960s he filmed included actress Diana Dors and DJ Pete Murray.

Art’s projection room

Art’s home movies, along with many of the Full Circle collection of films will be carefully stored and catalogued and will soon be available to search for on the MACE online film catalogue. Thanks Art!

Kay

The Filmed Record and Community History – sharing the experience of finding and using film in the community


Venue for the MACE/CAHG regional conference: The Hive, Worcester photo courtesy HivebyTECU Consulting UK

MACE (Media Archive for Central England),  CAHG (Community Archive Heritage Group) and representatives from the Full Circle History groups joined forces last Thursday to raise awareness of archive film and its importance as a historical resource.  The conference took place at Europe’s first joint university and public library at Worcester called The Hive.

Inside The Hive, Worcester: photo courtesy HiveInsidebyWordShore

Full Circle Senior Curator Kay Ogilvie said: “The conference was enriched by the 6 representatives of community history groups screening the footage they found during their search for film in their communities as part of the Heritage Lottery funded Full Circle Project. Our thanks go to John Holloway of Aston on Trent, Anita Syers-Gibson of North Herefordshire, Sarah Bradley of Belbroughton, David Clark of Fownhope, David Amos of Annesley and Bob Massey of Arnold. The films they found were a fascinating window into history and brought the past alive like no other record.”

Full Circle Film cataloguer Catherine English said: “It was great to hear from people who’ve been involved in Full Circle and the positive impact it has had on their groups which will hopefully continue beyond the lifetime of the project.”

Some comments from participants……….

MACE, and all the other regional archives are, without doubt, an essential and positive asset to maintaining film as an important element of our regional heritage. The Full Circle project that has engaged communities to seek out their own corner of England Past has, for our village history group, raised the profile of heritage, enabled individuals to acquire new skills and brought a new dimension to community involvement. We hope this project will inspire others to build on its foundations.”  John Holloway Aston on Trent History Group

Anita Syers-Gibson of North Herefordshire History group

“It was fascinating to hear the organisers of other groups explaining how they came to discover long-forgotten cine film collections in their communities and how they used the films for the entertainment and education of their audiences.Frank Dale used his films to entertain local audiences in village halls and pubs, and now, 60 years later, we are doing just the same – and the Full Circle is complete!” Anita Syers-Gibson, North Herefordshire History Group

“Thanks for yesterday – it was useful to get together and to see and hear how other groups had gone about gathering moving images . We dont know how typical the six of us were compared with others – it would have been good to have had a few more there. The venue was certainly impressive – made our self-help village library seem very small !” David and Margaret Clark from Fownhope

Sarah Bradley Belbroughton History Group

“It was interesting the different ways that people had used the old movie footage. The quality was also very good bearing in mind the age of some of the film footage. Many thanks for giving me the opportunity of giving a presentation to the Conference.” David Amos Annesley Project Officer

James Patterson, Director of MACE said: “I have never had any doubt about the potential importance of moving images in the community context or of their ability to add to our understanding of community history. What struck me about the event was the emotional impact that the material had had in the community and how in some cases an involvement with the Full Circle project has had a transformational effect in the community.

I think that the impact of the project is a testament to all the MACE colleagues who have worked on the project to make it so successful and to our community partners who have embraced film so wholeheartedly.”

Media Archive for Central England (MACE) www.macearchive.org  Community Archive Heritage Group (CAHG) http://www.communityarchives.org.uk/  The Hive, Worcester  http://www.thehiveworcester.org/

MACE supports D.H.Lawrence Festival mining heritage talk and bus tour


Dr David Amos in front of the Headstocks at Annesley Colliery, the pit he worked at for 24 years. This photo was taken on the last day of production on January 30th 2000

Ex coalminer and now academic, Dr David Amos (BA/PGCE-FE/PhD), gave a fascinating talk on the mining heritage of Nottinghamshire on Wednesday at the D.H.Lawrence Heritage Centre, Eastwood, as part of the D.H.Lawrence Festival. David has been helping the Full Circle project to search for film in the area and has found some fascinating mining footage that he was able to incorporate into his mining heritage talk. We at MACE have transferred the original 8mm cine films onto DVD and are storing the originals in our purpose built archive for future generations to enjoy and study.

The last shift for the miners –  The photo dates from 1985 and is taken at Pye Hill No.1 Colliery at Underwood, Notts just prior to its closure in  August 1985

The talk accompanies the Mining Heritage Bus Tour on Sunday – the tour will visit some of the coalmining heritage sites, including Brinsley Headstocks, Underwood, Annesley, Newstead and Digby. It will introduce you to some of the high profile and sometimes controversial characters linked with the former pit sites including Arthur Lawrence (father of D.H.Lawrence), Colin Clarke, Harold Larwood, and George Spencer.

Film screening of 1930s footage, Ashbourne Friday 7th September, St Oswald’s Church Hall 2.30pm


Scene from the archive film show – Kniveton farming

Come along for a real treat and a trip down memory lane. We will be screening this long lost footage of scenes in and around the village of Kniveton and Ashbourne in Derbyshire.

Stacking the hay – Kniveton 1930s

These films are from the Wright/Ratcliffe collection and date from the 1930s. Shot by Wilfred Ratcliffe, the chauffeur to Mr Wright, they cover the summers of 1935 – 1939 and are a fascinating insight into village life.

This screening is being shown as part of the U3A calendar of events. Please come along and show your support  – all welcome.

‘Past Lives’ – live performance and Full circle archive film


Dave Sturt, Theo Travis, Clare Bhabra and Deirdre Benscik playing a live film soundtrack to images of the Sarah Bradley film collection

Renowned musicians Dave Sturt (fretless bass/sound design), Theo Travis (flute, sax), Deirdre Benscik (cello) and Clare Bhabra (violin) play an evocative soundtrack to this fascinating collection of film from the 1930s onwards. Dave and Theo collaborated with visual artist Anthony Hatton to produce this thought provoking and engaging performance.

The films were collected as part of the MACE/Full Circle film search project funded by the Heritage Lottery. MACE would like to thank all those who deposited their films as part of this project and contributed to the rich screen heritage of the midlands.

Dave Sturt and Theo Travis

Guest musicians Deirdre Benscik and Clare Bhabra are from the renowned  Sinfonia ViVA.

deirdre Benscik and Clare Bhabra

Another Day! Another Fantastic Full Circle Screening by Fownhope Local History Group at Tarrington Village Hall, Herefordshire..



Yesterday I was delighted to spend the afternoon with Fownhope Local History Group and a members  of the Tarrington and Herefordshire communities. The group’s advertised ‘film of the day’ was a fabulous compilation of material, put together by Philip Leach from the Media Archive for Central England, consisting of some great Hop Picking and Farming footage from Peter Davies and John Barnett’s personal cine-film collections. The collections were found by the Fownhope Local History Group and have now been digitised with the help of the MACE’s Heritage Lottery Funded Full Circle Film Search Project.

As usual Rachel and her team were on hand to bake lots of delicious cakes and biscuits and pour fresh cups of tea at the interval – which were included in the £3 ticket price!Weston Beggard Hop Farmer John Barnett spoke during the interval about his experience of being a Hop Farmer over the past 50 years and why he chose to record the Hop farming/ cultivation process using his cine camera. His collection has now been digitised and the original cinefilms are being preserved at The Media Archive for Central England.

http://www.macearchive.org/Archive/Title/hops/MediaEntry/49102.html


Claston Farm – Hop Farmer Davies and his wife Pam. Peter Davies discusses with the audience his own experience of being a Hop Farmer in Herefordshire and just how much things have changed during his lifetime.

Overall, it was a great afternoon for learning about Herefordshire and Hops and for looking back at life from the late 1940s to 1970s.

If you have any old films, cine or tape or moving image materials relating to the Midlands region and would like to know how to look after them, please get in touch with us at MACE (Media Archive for Central England) to learn how to preserve them for future generations for years to come.

Photography © Lucie Kerley

Walsall Sea Scouts Archive Film Screening @ The Crossing


                                          3RD  WALSALL  SEA  SCOUTS  PRESENTS          

     THE  KINESCOUT  PRODUCTIONS  1929  –  1957

   BY  SARG  (LEONARD  STANLEY) 

Tickets £3.50 and all proceeds will go to Walsall Sea Scouts.

 

With help from MACE’s Heritage Lottery funded Full Circle Project plus some Government funding a set of old films have been restored and put onto DVD in order that they may be shown to members of the public at St Pauls the Crossing Walsall.

The footage includes a 30 minute long synopsis of a feature film “Haunted  Harbour” inCops and Robbers” using members of the 3rd Walsall Sea Scouts to act out comical scenes. The script for this particular film was written by the nationally renowned Boys Book author and friend of Lord Baden Powell Percy Westerman.

Although supposedly depicting scenes from other parts of the country, all the filming was done in Walsall and it will be apparent to a local audience that the end of the Bridge at Potter Heigham is actually the White Heart Hotel in Caldmore!  There are also scenes shot in and around the old Sister Dora Hospital.

Interesting fact: Did you know the Walsall Sea Scouts were part of the team that organised the 1948 Olympic Sailing Team. 

It is not only a record of what our young Walsall people were doing in the mid 1900`s but an historical record of things of popular interest and an insight to some of the thoughts on how modern technology might be developed in the future (our time now) all with a comic turn! 

The films themselves will be stored from now on at MACE in their humidity and temperature controlled archive store, as they are considered to be of historical interest.

Photography © Lucie Kerley

Ombersley in the 70s Revisited Full Circle Film Screening: With the building of a NEW Bypass & The Queens Silver Jubilee Celebrations the 1970s proved to be a busy time for the Worcs village of Ombersley.


Sytchampton Village Hall. Photo by Roy Murphy.

On Saturday 31st March, I @luciekerley was invited to attend Sytchampton Village Hall for a film screening of a recently digitised cinefilm entitled: “Ombersley in the 70s”. 

MACE Full Circle Curator – Lucie Kerley addressing the audience at an Ombersley in the 70s Full Circle Film Screening at Sytchampton Village Hall. Photo by Roy Murphy.

Arthur and Mike Turner – Film makers and members of Ombersley Dramatic Society.

The event was attended by a local audience of around 100 people who enjoyed the 2 hour film screening plus interval for a nostalgic natter with tea and biscuit style refreshments!The film was originally shot by Mike and Arthur Turner over 40 years ago and has been digitised by the Media Archive for Central England‘s Heritage Lottery Funded Full Circle Project after a film search event was launched by Roy Murphy of the Droitwich History and Archaeology Society. The aim of the Full Circle Project is to connect Midlands communities with their on screen heritage, and this is exactly what this event was all about!

Mike and Arthur took turns to do a live running commentary over to films, using the original notes and a background music, which really brought them to life!

Kindly organised by the Ombersley Dramatic Society , it allowed members of the local community a chance to revisit life in the 70s and all that it meant to their local area.

A new Bypass!

Ombersley Bypass 2012.

1970s Ombersley Bypass Grand Opening saw a procession of Vintage Cars lead the way to a traffic free future.

Silver Jubilee Celebrations! 

 A booming local village with a real sense of community spirit!

If you have any old films, cine or tape or moving image materials relating to the Midlands region and would like to know how to look after them, please get in touch with us at MACE (Media Archive for Central England) to learn how to preserve them for future generations for years to come.
Web: www.macearchive.org

Photography © Lucie Kerley

Full Circle Archive Film Screening 31.03.12 Sytchampton Village Hall to show digitised Droitwich/ Ombersley archive cine film finds to local community.


MACE Full Circle Curator – Lucie Kerley shakes hands with Depositor Mike Turner as he hands over his cinefilm to be digitised and preserved by MACE.

A good while back I met Mike Turner of Ombersley at a Droitwich History & Archaeology Society meeting; when I first went along to talk about MACE’s Full Circle Community Film Search Project.

Mike had brought along a selection of cinefilms which he had shot some 40 + years ago. With help from the Heritage Lottery Fund, MACE was able to digitise this material – just one of 200 collections found during the Full Circle Project’s search for film, which are now going to be shown by  Ombersley Dramatic Society at Sytchampton Village Hall, Worcestershire. DY13 9SY on 31 March commencing at 7.30. pm.

Tickets can be obtained from Mike Turner, 01905 620757.

Other titles from Mike Turner’s Collection include:

“The combining of the Parishes of Ombersley and Doverdale in 1973 created one of the largest parishes in Worcestershire. The Parish extends from Crossway Green in the north to Hawford in the south and from east to west from the River Salwarpe to the River Severn. There is excellent farmland with two-thirds approximately devoted to arable crops and one-third pasture for livestock. The soil is similar to that of the Vale of Evesham.

“The village has a rich heritage of half-timbered houses built between 1450 and 1750, mostly within a short distance of the roundabout at the centre of the village. Within the village centre are 22 listed buildings, mainly black and white timbered buildings each unique in style and endowed with considerable charm. The availability of timber explains the concentration of so many timbered buildings in the village. Whilst most are now in use as private residences, some have had a colourful chequered history linked to a time when the village provided all basic services for residents. Many were occupied by a range of businesses including police houses, post offices, public houses, forges, shops, cafes and restaurants.

Villagers have a keen awareness of this historical heritage. There were expressions of sadness and regret when building of the A449, Worcester to Kidderminster trunk necessitated the demolition of buildings. Yet this bypass, with increasing motorised traffic, has contributed to ensuring the fabric of the village is preserved.

An opportunity for villagers to step back in time and to visit Ombersley’s recent past will be the showing of a collection of films taken in the 1970’s illustrating contemporary Ombersley. Films of that era have been digitised by Media Archive for Central England and show construction of the A449, the machines in use at that time and construction workers in their labours. Adult members of the audience may recognise themselves as children at play and performing in shows at the Memorial Hall. The programme is to be presented by Ombersley Dramatic Society at Sytchampton Village Hall on 31 March commencing at 7.30. pm. Tickets can be obtained from Mike Turner, 01905 620757.”

Written by Roy Murphy for The Parish of Ombersley and Doverdale Newsletter.

Opposite the car park of the Crown and Sandys is the 16th or 17th century Pewterer’s House. This originated in Bewdley and was re-erected in 1841 and eventually divided to form two cottages.

Cresswells, a ‘cruck house’ located alongside the roundabout was built before 1500. In 1926 the first petrol station in Ombersley was installed a few yards to the north of Cresswells.

If you have any old films, cine or tape or moving image materials relating to the Midlands region and would like to know how to look after them, please get in touch with us at MACE (Media Archive for Central England) to learn how to preserve them for future generations for years to come.
Web: www.macearchive.org