Happy 1st Birthday Full Circle Project!!


Sharon & John Naylor were the first people to deposit their father, Fred Naylor's, cinefilm collection with the Full Circle Project

After only 12 months working on MACE’s Heritage Lottery Funded Full Circle Project we have successfully exceeded the project’s target of engaging 60 communities from across the Midlands.

Amblecote History Society call out for hidden film gems in local community Newspaper

We currently have 70 organisations involved in the project, carrying out film searches, screenings and publicity events and raising awareness of the heritage value of film.

So far we have enlisted the help of over 250 fantastic volunteers who have helped in our search for film. We have reached over 2300 people at our screening events that have taken place over the past 12 months with lots more group activities & events planned throughout 2011.

Full Circle volunteers bake cakes for local history society’s film screening

We have reached the amazing total of 115 people depositing film with the MACE archive, amounting to over 900 reels of film. Some of the depositors collections consist of 1 reel while our largest collection consists of 111 reels of film.

Diana Smith and Roger Dale visit MACE to deposit their father, Frank Dale's, cinefilm collection

A selection of films from the Frank Dale collection

Without the grant from the Heritage Lottery to employ and support the project staff, this could not have happened. MACE’s Full Circle Cataloguer, Catherine English, has been working closely with depositors and groups to glean as much information about the collections as possible in order to contextualise the films ready for sharing with people on the online catalogue.

MACE’s Full Circle Cataloguer, Catherine English

Full Circle Technician, Andrew Jenkins, has been busy digitising the old footage into a new accessible format. Andrew and the MACE team are constantly improving the transfer process to get the best possible copy from the material so that the original can be preserved in archival conditions at MACE.

Full Circle Project InformationAudience members at Belbroughton Primary School's Saturday Full Circle Screening event eagerly await the showing of local archive films.

Mr & Mrs Every at the Full Circle Screening event at Belbroughton Primary School

Bill Every and his wife were also in attendance to sit back and reminisce as a selection of films from their own collection was shown at the Belbroughton screening.

By the end of the project in 2013, we will have generated more activity, engaged more volunteers, involved more schools, held more events and uncovered more remarkable material illuminating our community heritage than any of the targets we set ourselves in the project.

A film still from the John Instance Collection of a Police march through Selly Park

Having created publicity packs and toolkits we work in the community with local groups supporting the local film search activity and passing on the knowledge and skills required to help to assess and work with the material.

By continuing to help to arrange local screenings of footage found or its use in local schools, the project enables people to engage with and enjoy their screen heritage and this engagement is already beginning to generate new activity and spin off projects.

Cannon Hill Park Full Circle Group hold a screening of local archive film at their Spring FestivalFull Circle Depositor Keith Hogkins brings his Tipton cinefilm collection with him to the Full Circle film Screening event at The Public

We are currently working with the Nottinghamshire YMCA Century of Youth Project http://www.ymcadigital.com – a new film project exploring the lives of young people in the East Midlands over the last 100 years, BBC Reel History Project, Wolverhampton Archives, The Ring of Villages Centenary Project, Kings Norton Girls School Centenary, Leamington Spa Museum & Art Gallery and many many more – helping them to discover their screen heritage.

Full Circle and YMCA Century of Youth Film project - preparing to interview older members of the community

Stills taken from a film of Radford Semele, near Leamington SpaRadford Semele film

Full Circle Depositor Joanne Probert was delighted to have her cinefilm collection digitised by MACE's Full Circle Project and has now shared the results with her daughters family in Australia.

The project blog https://macearchive.wordpress.com/  (and Twitter) have been really successful in putting disparate groups in contact with each other, sharing information, good practice and successes so far. The engagement of the BBC and the broadcast of some of the material found in the project has generated further activity and comment.

Tipton Harriers Centenary Celebration Full Circle Screening EventThe Tipton Harriers on film

Finally, have a look at some of the clips that are now available to watch on http://www.macearchive.org from the fabulous selection of home-movies found by Full Circle so far. http://www.macearchive.org/Archive/Title/bruckshaw-glossop-carnival/MediaEntry/40725.html

For more information on how you can get involved with the Full Circle Project check out:

http://www.macearchive.org/Full-Circle.html

A big thank you to all involved from Kay and Lucie.

May the search go on!

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Fownhope Local’s Rewind and enjoy an afternoon of Herefordshire Archive Films


Amanda Huntley of The Huntley Film Archives addresses the audience at Fownhope Memorial Village Hall

 

On Wednesday, 9th March the Fownhope Local History Group, one of the Full Circle Project’s participating groups took part in hosting one of the screenings for Rewind Festival 2011. The event which took place at Fownhope Memorial Village Hall featured a screening of “rare archive film featuring Herefordshire and Shropshire from 1900 onwards.”

The venue was packed to the rafters with around 115 in attendance who came from all over Herefordshire with some also travelling as far as Wales to reminisce of times gone by, watching footage of local events caught on film some 60 and some 70 or more years ago. The screening featured some fabulous material from  Huntley’s Commercial Film Archive Collection with some footage estimated to date back to the early 1900s.

“REWIND, the community film archive project from Flicks in the Sticks in collaboration with Huntley Film Archives is delighted to present this extraordinary programme, the result of a year long research, at venues in Herefordshire and Shropshire in February and March. Volunteers have been trained as film archivists and have catalogued footage from the Huntley Film Archives which brings the past, including some of the sights and sounds of the two counties, to life.”

Highlights of the screening included :

Hereford May Fair in 1910
Tommies march out of the City in 1914
Kington Carnival in the 1920s
Cider making in the 1930s
The old cattle market in the 1940s
Leominster Three Counties Fair in the 1950s.

Following the Rewind Screening which was really brought to life when accompanied by Amanda Huntley’s animated commentry, the audience was treated to home-made cakes and refreshments before settling down for the second half.

The screening of archive material was particularly poignant for one member of the audience who had no recollection that he had even been caught on film as a young lad working the land with fellow Herefordshire farmers over 60 years ago and was able to watch this footage for the first time.

The Fownhope Local History Group Chairman, David Clark, used the occasion as a platform for showing what film collections had been found as part of their group’s involvement with the MACE archive’s,  Heritage Lottery Funded, Full Circle Project. The group have been looking for archive footage relating to Fownhope and the local area for the past 8 months and have been hugely successful in unearthing around 7 collections with more popping their heads up all the time. The event was a chance to show the people of Fownhope and the wider area, the results of the footage that had been digitised with the help of MACE & HLF funding.

It was a fantastic opportunity for myself, Lucie Kerley Curator for Community & Acquisition at MACE and my colleague Catherine English Full Circle’s Cataloguer, to meet the depositors of the film collections in person for the first time and to hear how much joy they and their families had gotten from the collections being digitised. Smiles all round!

Full Circle Depositor Joanne Probert was delighted with the result of her digitised cine collection that has now been seen by many of her relatives living in AustraliaPeter Davies holds his DVD copy of the cinefilm collection that was digitised with the help of the Heritage Lottery Funding received by MACE's Full Circle Project, Peter has also deposited more reels of 8mm film to be digitised and archived at MACEPeter Davies holds his DVD copy of the cinefilm collection that was digitised with the help of the Heritage Lottery Funding received by MACE's Full Circle Project, Peter has also deposited more reels of 8mm film to be digitised and archived at MACE

Midlands We Need Your Home Movies!Screening of Herefordshire based ATV archive footage at Fownhope Memorial Hall

Peter Davies holds his DVD copy of the cinefilm collection that was digitised with the help of the Heritage Lottery Funding received by MACE’s Full Circle Project, Peter has also deposited more reels of 8mm film to be digitised and archived at MACE

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The group will continue to look for more moving image materials in their area that are in need of digitising to ensure that this valuable window into their local history is one that is not lost but can long be enjoyed by both our generation and those yet to come.

Screen Heritage and the Big Society…the challenge for the public film archives


Screen Heritage and the Big Society…the challenge for the public film archives

by James Patterson, MACE Director

The Media Archive for Central England Film Store

(This is an edited version of a paper delivered to “Film Heritage, Digital Future”, a conference held at Birmingham City University 4/3/11.) 

The last time I wrote about how I saw the challenges for the film archive sector was nearly 2 years ago. It was not the first time I had written about the subject.

 I’m writing about it again and I suspect that it won’t be the last time.

 And why would it be the last time? The film archiving itself is always challenging, the approaches we take as archivists are always developing and the context in which we operate – the political context with a small p, and in consequence the funding context, is always in flux. So the challenges we face are always changing. What is unchanging is our responsibility to develop a service which meets the needs of the community and realizes all the potential in the collections we develop and care for.

 I must preface my remarks by saying that my views on the matter are my own – borne out of nearly 32 years working in the film archives in the public sector and the last 20 of those at a senior level in both a national and regional context. I am not suggesting that I am representing anyone else’s views.

 I am limiting my remarks to the film archives in the public sector and the challenges faced there because this is the sector I know. It is not in any way to ignore the important work done for the survival of our moving image culture by other organizations. In fact, I think it is really important that we begin to develop appropriate and closer working relationships across the whole sector as soon as we can.

 I’ve called this piece Screen Heritage and the Big Society not because I want to discourse on how we can develop community action in support of our sector – though I may touch on this – but more as a shorthand for the wider current context of our services.

 And what is that context? What is the current challenge?

 The public film archive services are currently delivered by 2 UK wide archives (BFI National Archive and IWM); there are services for Scotland and Wales delivered from departments of their respective National Libraries; and there are 9 small archive services operating in the English regions.

 All of these archives are independent of each other – the relationships between them and the way the funding works are complex and have been made more complicated in the past few years – partly by devolution of responsibility to the nations, partly by a lack of a clear strategic and shared overall vision for the services in England.

 “The current political context is one of decreasing public funds and of being told to do more with less.”

 The drive from the current government to reduce the perceived unnecessary bureaucracies has impacted as much in the film world as elsewhere.

 The UK Film Council (UKFC) is being closed with all public support for film activity transferring the BFI. The regional screen agencies (independent, though closely tied to UKFC) are working out how they will become (or engage with) a new body to support screen related creative and cultural industry activity outside the capital. That body is called Creative England. The proposal is that it should have three hubs North, Central and South.

 Creative England is now working with the BFI on defining their relationship so that strategic priorities and delivery paths for the range of areas in which they have some responsibility can be achieved.

 These discussions are ongoing and will be resolved during the coming year (2011).

 Creative England is currently consulting on an interim strategy document which covers the financial year 2011/12. Driven by even further reducing funds, it is clear from the consultation documents that there are expectations of a structural change of the regional film archives in England.

 The nature of the change is currently defined only in the sentence ‘there is an immediate need to develop a more cost effective/aggregated out of London network of RFAs…’.

 There is an old story about a man who, travelling in Ireland, stopped and asked a farmer for directions to Dublin. “If I was going to Dublin”, the farmer replied “I would not be starting from here”. The circumstances we find ourselves in seem to me to resonate with that. The starting point for our journey is one that we might not have chosen.

 But matters are further complicated by not having great clarity at this stage about the destination. Indeed, some of the sector like the place we are in and want to stay. But we have been and are being told that we must travel and some of the sector feel the need to travel and that a journey would be beneficial in many ways, but the problem we face is that the necessity to travel is not, at the moment, being combined with a clear destination. At best we have a sense that – to stretch the metaphor towards breaking point – we know that we should probably head towards Dublin because Dublin is where we probably ought to be. We hope to be engaged in a conversation in which we agree that Dublin is our destination. But our worst fears are that that conversation may take place without us and we might end up being sent to Cork.! (a place I am very fond of by the way but which must for the purposes of the metaphor represent an inappropriate destination).

 The public film archive sector in the English regions is currently perceived, rightly or wrongly, as being fragmentary and as needlessly and inefficiently duplicating resources, activities and facilities. Because it is seen this way there is a sense that the aggregation of the sector will reduce costs.

 This is our starting point. And in the current climate where strategic bodies which have served the English regions are being reduced typically from nine to three, where regionalism is out and where the public purse is too stretched to cover the kind of more peripheral public service activity that we represent, we are not, in my view, in a good place to make the case for the retention of the status quo.

 “So change is the order of the day.”

 Is there anything else we can glean from the Creative England document?

 I am greatly comforted by a recognition that, at least in this transition year, CE have made the whole area of broader film culture (which includes the heritage sector) one of their three priorities. I am equally comforted by the their desire not to undo or damage the benefit we have managed to accrue from the very welcome investment of capital into the sector which led to the Screen Heritage UK programme which is currently in train.

 I know that not all my colleagues concur, but I for one think that there is a strong case for the aggregation of elements of our work. I have been advocating this approach for some time…not because I think it will save money, but because I think it may be possible to improve the services we offer by taking a different approach.

 And in all of our consideration of these challenges the service…what we do and how well we achieve it must lie at the heart.

 So what is our role?

 I have moved away from defining the archive in terms of “collection”. I see the role of the regional film archive as being about engaging people with screen heritage to achieve positive benefit.

 Now clearly a key part of that is the core work of uncovering the region’s screen heritage, ensuring that it is secure now and for future generations and available now and for future generations. And there are particular and specialist archive facilities, functions and expertises that need to be made available to do that work.

 Some of these things have to be located in the region in order for the organization to work effectively in delivering a regional service, some of them – the more backroom functions – can be shared and provided more remotely.

Steenbeck and view of Store

Our responsibility is to make sure that things are done to the right and proper standard to achieve the outcome…not necessarily to do all of them ourselves.

 “But each part of the country has its own identity and has its own priorities and imperatives. Each part of the country presents different opportunities for engagement – and if we are to work effectively at a local level in engaging people with the very remarkable resources we are developing, then we have to be alive to the variety of the opportunities and potential partnerships – and that means working on the ground locally and having the right capacity to facilitate that.”

One of the collections of film found in the Midlands during the HLF funded Full Circle Project

 And working out how best to develop individual and shared responsibilities for the film archive sector must be an inclusive conversation. A conversation in which all the partners, national and regional, come to the table and, recognizing the value and the complementary nature of their different services, their different approaches and the different kinds of contexts in which they work, sort out a genuinely strategic network of service.

 The film archives do not exist in a vacuum. They are part of the wider cultural offer – they are part of the broad cultural landscape and have the potential to impact across a very wide range of cultural partnerships. We need to build on existing relationships nationally and regionally and locally and take care not to damage it in the changes which lie ahead.

 And if all of the changes that lie ahead of us are driven by the need to reduce the amount which we see from the public purse, then developing a new business model and one which is sustainable is probably our biggest challenge.

 To create a new model to deliver a sensible and engaged service to over 40 million people outside London with a Treasury settlement of less than the £290,000 which is, this year, shared between the 9 English regional Film Archives is very challenging indeed.

 It would be quite wrong of me to suggest that £290,000 is all the support we have because for all of us this is only part of a much larger basket of Lottery and other project funding and institutional and in kind support which we have very successfully each developed over the years around this central plank. But it is the central plank and is of considerable importance.

 That the sector has managed to deliver as much as it has with such a small core platform gives me some encouragement for the road ahead. Clearly there are entrepreneurial people working in the sector. But we need to be open to ideas which challenge the received wisdom about how we develop income to cover our costs.

 Sacrilegious maybe, but we must examine again what our ‘public service’ remit means in the current climate.

I believe, and have done for some time, that we must make a contribution, and a more considerable one, to covering our overheads.

We are “not for profit” organizations but that does not mean that we are “not for income”.

The more we can generate, the more we can deliver. We must invest time and energy into the development of innovative ways and means of getting our resources into use and to generating income from that use.

 We must argue for the retention of a core funding platform – without that we can do nothing. We must continue to make the case for that core platform to be set at a level which is realistic – but we must expect to deliver a responsible level of financial return ourselves – just as we must continue to raise funds from Lottery and other project sources and through partnership working. We must at the same time take care to make sure that our development plans and our core activity is not unduly skewed by chasing funds with inappropriate priorities.

 And yes, we must engage community help – we must respond to the so called Big Society.

 It’s not that all of these things mean we must suddenly start to do things which are different. We must simply adapt to the times and the circumstances – as we always have.

 The sector faces some hard decisions and there are many things that will discomfort us in the months ahead.

 But actually at heart I’m optimistic. I think that, challenging as the coming period is likely to be, there is also opportunity – and I, for one, though not without some anxiety, am looking forward to it and believe that, with an appropriate attitude and a spirit of collaboration, the coming changes could just develop into something very good.

 James Patterson

Director, MACE, March 2011

Full Circle Project welcomes Amblecote History Society and their ‘Can Do’ Attitude!


Amblecote History Society

After an invitation from Helen Cook, Programme Secretary, of Amblecote History Society, whom I first had the pleasure of meeting at the Dudley Archives and Local History Service a few months back,  where I gave a presentation to local history societies about MACE’s new HLF funded Full Circle Project. Helen got in touch and asked me to come and visit the society and spread the Full Circle gospel.

[Amblecote lies immediately north of the historic town of Stourbridge.  From the 17th century, there have been glassworks in Amblecote, including Thomas Webb and Dennis Hall, and together with the adjoining village of Wordsley, formed the main centre of the Stourbridge glass industry, now known as “The Glass Quarter”. The glass tradition was brought by Hugenot immigrants to the area. Glass is still produced to this day in albeit much reduced numbers following the deindustrialisation of the area in the 1980s and 1990s which saw the closure of many of the larger companies.] extract from wikipedia.

Amblecote History Society http://www.amblecotehistorysociety.org.uk   holds its meetings at the Amblecote Holy Trinity Church & Hall and has around 90 members. They also put on well attended talks and events throughout the year and also arrange coach trips and days out. 

Fancy a trip to Bletchley Park? Contact the Amblecote History Society.

Helen was excited by the idea of getting the rest of their group members involved and wanted to share her enthusiasm for doing their very own film search in and around the Amblecote area. They have recently appealed for film in their local Stourbridge Newspaper and have had some interesting results!

Stourbridge News

I gave a short presentation to members of the history society and members of the public, which included a short screening of local ATV footage that is held at MACE Archive. The film showed clips of recognisable local industry, and life in the Black Country as it was some 40 years or so ago.

The Black Country 1969 DVD on sale at Amblecote History Society meeting £14.99

Chairman Pat Martin, who you will know as last years Mayor of Dudley, implored audience members to “Get it all out!”, asking them to make the effort to get their collections out of their lofts before it was too late. In order for us to be able to preserve these important pieces of social history, before they are lost forever.

Amblecote appeal for film

 

Members of the public and Amblecote History Society get settled ready for a MACE archive film screening

After watching the archive films, Pat stated “It seemed like a totally different world, but we were all around.”  The screening provoked nostalgia and many fond memories amongst audience members who had either worked at the places featured or who remembered local celebrities such as Jumping Joe (Josie) Derby and the Queens visit. Health and Safety regulations have definitely changed somewhat over the past 40 years thats for sure!

Chair Pat Martin.

Amblecote History Society are appealing for members of the public who may live in their local area or who may have used to live in the area, who have footage or films, home-movies, that they have made of local events – to come forward and preserve these gems so that they can be watched again, enjoyed and celebrated by the local and wider midlands communities.

There was a wonderful moment when a gentleman came up to me at the end of the screening and explained that he had infact visited MACE’s website www.macearchive.org  before and was astonished when he came across a Stourbridge clip that he didnt even know existed,  that showed his late father. He went on to explain that when he met his wife, she never got the chance to meet his father – as he had sadly passed away – however, he was able to show her this clip and this rare piece of film that had managed to capture an image of his father that will forever be preserved in history.

It is occasions like this that make working in a film archive so worthwhile. To think that the material that comes into MACE may hold fascinating insights into the social pasttimes of many people from all over the midlands, and many treasured memories too, is a fantastic motivation to keep looking for more.

If you have any film that features Amblecote or the surrounding area, or film that relates to the Midlands in general, please contact: Helen Cook – Programme Secretary for Amblecote History Society on 01384 395034  or email: helenjoy.cook@btinternet.com

Stirchley Locals Enjoy MACE Archive Film Taster at Christmas Screening!


It’s A Wonderful Life

Popcorn anyone?

Before Christmas I was  kindly invited along by the wonderful Stirchley Happenings Community Group, who also run the Stirchley Community Market, to come and talk about the Media Archive for Central England’s (MACE) Full Circle Film Search Project.

Stirchley Happenings Community Group

Film fans were greeted with smiles and the chance to purchase popcorn and cakes as refreshments for their film. The screening took place upstairs at Stirchley Community Church and enticed an audience of over 100 people, which was a fantastic turnout considering the treacherous weather conditions and icy streets outside.

Travelling Bug House Audience

Stirchley Community ChurchAs a way of letting members of the local community know about the search for film and home-movies in their area Stirchley Happenings and MACE were able to work together and arrange a short screening of local archive footage to feature as a short before the main festive screeening of Frank Capra's film - 'It's A Wonderful Life'.

MACE archive film screening

 

We Need Your Home-movies!!

Stirchley Happenings Members Chris and Roxie take money for tickets.
Stirchley Happenings are acting as a collection point for film and home-movies found in the local area.

 

By showing a selection of clips from the MACE archive which related to the surrounding areas was a great way of showing the Stirchley

Great feedback for Stirchley Happenings in response to the 3rd Travelling Bug House Screening. community what exists in the MACE archive at present and why it is important that we continue to add to it. A real afternoon treat!
Good Old Film!

 

If you have any cinefilm, or home-movies that you or your family have made and are interested in having digitised as part of the Heritage Lottery Full Circle Project please get in touch with your local group representative Chris Swann – 07966660771 or email: chrisstirchleyhappenings@gmail.com

For more information about MACE, or for advice on how to care for your films. Please check out our website: www.macearchive.org or call the MACE team on 0116 252 5066

Full Circle Curator Lucie Kerley talks to BHBN’s radio presenter Brian Henderson about searching for Midlands Home-movies!


BHBN Radio volunteer staff, Ian, Robert and Brian in the studio.

Yesterday, I was delighted to be invited onto the BHBN  Hospital ‘Words & Music’ radio show http://www.bhbn.net/HISTORY%202.htm – which is based at Birmingham City Hospital.

I was first approached by Robert Bartlett, who is the producer on the Wednesday show from 6pm – 7pm. Presenter Brian Henderson interviewed me about my current job working for MACE as a curator for the Full Circle Project.

The Full Circle Project works alongside Midlands Community Groups to search for hidden films in the community.

He asked some very interesting questions about why it is important to preserve these cinefilms and also how the money from the Heritage Lottery Grant gets spent. Brian also mentioned that his father also shot some cinefilm footage of their family life in Birmingham and also family holidays.

The BHBN network was founded in 1952  by Hon. Alderman Mrs Freda Cocks OBE as the Birmingham Hospital Commentaries Association (BHCA). It became the BHBA in 1955 and BHBN in 1972. It adopted the name of Birmingham’s  BHBN in 1992, and adopted it’s current broadcast name of BHBN HOSPITAL RADIO in 2006

Nationally, hospital radio first started life in York in 1926.

The Network was a pioneer in many aspects of its broadcasting. Time spent in hospital back in the early days was very different to today where day case surgery is common. In the 1950s and 1960s a two-week stay in hospital was the ‘norm’ and as such the stations volunteers could forge good relationships with patients. ” An extract from the BHBN website.

The BHBN Radio show broadcasts daily to City Hospital, Good Hope Hospital, Heartlands Hospital, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, The Women’s Hospital. www.bhbn.net tel: 0121 554 5522

Belbroughton History Society visit MACE archive to see the Full Circle Project’s cinefilm digitisation process.


 

Sarah and John from Belbroughton History Society visit the MACE archive

Merry Christmas Midlands from MACE’s Full Circle Project!

Over the past 6 months we have collected nearly 50 collections as part of the Full Circle Project’s search for Midlands home-movies! It has been a truly phenomenal response to an appeal for members of the midlands communities to search through their attics and dig out any old cinefilm or home -movies they may have stashed away.

As part of the project we are working alongside around 60 community groups from across the Midlands to search for these hidden gems. On Tuesday we had the pleasure of a visit from Sarah and John, members of Belbroughton History Society http://www.belbroughton.com/History.htm. They had expressed an interest in seeing what happens once the cine-film that has been found during their Full Circle Film search comes to the archive. It was a great day and we were able to explain the different procedures that the films must go through before they are copied and transferred into a digital format which the depositors and groups and members of the public can then enjoy watching for years to come.

When film initially comes to MACE it  has to be assessed – the film collection and it’s containers will be inspected for titles or any other give away information to see if  there is anything of particular social/historical relevance or value to the Midlands region.

Cinefilm collection

An accession number is then allocated  to each item in the collection –  e.g. 001/2010/020  – and this is then logged onto the MACE Accession log  along with the date the film came in, the date it was accessioned, the depositors name & address, quantity, gauge and whether a personal file has been set up and a deposit agreement signed.

We then create a receipt listing of all the film titles in the collection, including any related materials that people wish to deposit – such as projectors, viewers or splicers. This receipt is then printed and sent out to the depositor/donator who owns the collection and also to the participating Full Circle Group to keep for their own records.

The receipt is also placed in their depositor/donator/owner’s personal file which is held at MACE alongside a copy of their signed donation agreement and any other information about the titles in the collection.

Any films that are in the collection that are deemed appropriate and  need to be copied will then be prepared for copying: new white spacer is placed at the beginning and end of the reel and any torn perforations are repaired.  So for example, if there are a number of smaller 50ft reels in the collection these will be transferred onto one large 400ft reel to enable the transfer process to be faster and more efficient.

Once the films are prepared a new entry is created in the MACE catalogue for each title in the collection, so that they will appear searchable on the MACE website: www.macearchive.org, at this stage there is no video clip attached to the catalogue entry.

The film collection then has to be put onto a priority copying list which MACE’s Full Circle Technician Andrew Jenkins then works his way through. Using the Flash Scan and Flash Transfer equipment purchased with Heritage Lottery Fund grant, awarded to the project which will run until March 2013,  we are able to convert  a number of film gauges: Standard 8mm, Super 8mm, 9.5mm, and 16mm cinefilm. We also have the equipment to transfer other moving image formats such as: Beta SP, 1 inch tape, D2, Mini-DV & DV-cam.

MACE's Full Circle Technician Andrew Jenkins

The transfer process can take some time, as films are copied in real time and any adjustments to colour, saturation, white balance and exposure also have to be considered during this time. Once the original material has been transferred into a digital format, an archival copy LTO tape is made and also a viewing copy.

Andrew then trims the footage to make sure that the clips appear as they should do once they are on burnt to a DVD. The owner (depositor/donator) and the Full Circle Participating Group can then choose to have a DVD of the material which will be playable on the majority of DVD players or they can have an editable version – should they wish to compile their own screenings of the material found for public viewing.  Our cataloguer Catherine then looks through the material and keywords it as thoroughly as possibly to make sure that each title is accessible by members of the public. Eventually all material found during the Full Circle Project will be viewable online – on the www.macearchive.org website. Please visit our website if you require any more information about how to care for your cinefilm, or contact us here at MACE on 0116 252 5066 and we will be happy to help.

Full Circle Project - A public screening of archive material from the MACE archive.

If you know of anyone who has a film collection that deserves preserving, please get in touch with Full Circle Curator: Lucie Kerley on 0116 252 5931 or email lk99@le.ac.uk.  If you are a local history or community group wishing to take part in the Full Circle Project and are interested in searching for old cinefilm in your area – please get in touch.

Photographs courtesy of Lucie Kerley.

British Castle Enthusiasts – We Need Your Help! Can you identify the location of this British Castle?


Whilst viewing a film collection recently found by the Belbroughton History Society – we  came across a trip to a castle which overlooks either a river or an estuary? The collection is one of many that has been plucked from obscurity during the 3 year Heritage Lottery Funded Project. Members of groups scattered across both Full Circle Community’s search for film & home-movies. The hunt for old films will continue until March 2013.

A first glance, the reel which is labelled Evesham, we thought might be Chepstow Castle, but we can’t be sure  doesn’t appear to be?

Have you visited this Castle?

 

If so please get in touch with Full Circle Curator: Lucie Kerley – email:lk99@le.ac.uk

Every little helps in terms of cataloguing this film as thoroughly as possible.

Thank you!

From 500ft Hereford Bulls to a Dr that travels by Horse & Cart. Herefordshire Historians on the Hunt for Hidden Home-movies!


Audience member Mark Robinson watches the Full Circle Screening of material from the MACE ATV collection.

On Monday, 15th November, I was kindly invited along by Senior Archivist Rhys Griffith to the Herefordshire History & Archives Forum to discuss the MACE (Media Archive for Central England) Full Circle Project.

Tea, biscuits and a Full Circle Film search.

  The Full Circle film search project is funded by the Heritage Lottery with the aim being to work with community groups in order to preserve the people of the Midlands home-movies and then copy them into a format that as many people will be able to enjoy watching once more.

MACE archive film screening to promote Full Circle.

 The project will run until March 2013 and is searching for Midlands related moving image materials captured by the people who are at the very heart of their community.          

 

Herefordshire Record Office workers pour over a local map.

The Herefordshire History and Archives forum was attended by representative from a number of groups, including:

  • Jeff White – Cradley Heritage Group
  • Pam Hatherly – Leintwardine History Society
  • Anne Abbotts –  Wellington Heath Archive Group
  • David Clark – Fownhope History Group
  • Barbara Ferris – Dinedor Heritage Group
  • Mal Mason – Eardisley History Group
  • Dave Tristram – Herefordshire Council – Regeneration
  • Anita Syers-Gibson – Independent Volunteer
  • Barry Lawrence – Much Cowarne History Group
  • Alex Hoyle – Bromyard and District Local History Society
  • Mark Robinson – Webb-SHARE
  • Sue Knox – Herefordshire Council – Museum Development
  • Irene Orchard – Archive of Cider Pomology

Members of the Herefordshire History & Archive Forum.

 

Rhys Griffith - Senior Archivist at The Herefordshire Record Office

After catching up on the latest activities from each member, I gave a short presentation about the MACE archive Full Circle Project, and discussed why it was important that communities get involved in preserving their communities screen heritage.

As a way of promoting the Full Circle Project’s search for film, I put on a film, kindly compiled by MACE programmer Phil Leach,  showing clips taken from a selection of the ATV collection that is held at MACE.

The clips were  from taken from news stories that had made headlines over the past 40+ years. A glimpse of life in Herefordshire and some of the well-known characters that play a part in the making of Herefordshire history.

Smiles all round at memories of old Herefordshire.Dr Cyril Francis on his horse and cart doing the rounds, Hereford.

For more information on the Full Circle Project or to find out who your local participating group is please contact Lucie Kerley – Full Circle Project Curator at MACE. Tel: 0116 252 5931 0r Mob: 07919 896 505 email: lk99@le.ac.uk

To see more clips of Hereford or from other parts of the Midlands region check out www.macearchive.org and take a look at our online catalogue.

Photographs copyright Lucie Kerley.

Alfreton & District Heritage Trust join Full Circle and uncover footage of Cromford Raft Race…..


Footage of Cromford Raft Race filmed by the late Fred Alvey

Footage of Cromford Raft race dating from the 1970s has been discovered in Alfreton. When Mr Nicolls of Alfreton Heritage Trust contacted Full Circle to tell us about the films he had discovered –  I didn’t realize quite how many he was referring to – see the photos to get an idea of the size of this collection.

The filmmaker was the late Fred Alvey, who filmed many local events on his cinecamera. His brother Roy is depositing some of the collection with the Full Circle project. Local footage will be copied onto DVD for the whole community to enjoy.

Roy said his brother would be very proud to know that his collection is going to be stored and preserved for the future at the Media Archive for Central England film archive at the University of Leicester.

Fred's brother Roy, with some of Fred's film collection

Mrs Alvey, Roy Alvey, Mr Nicolls, Tony Fisher

Mr Nicolls with some of his vintage film equipment

Mrs Alvey, Roy Alvey, Mr Nicolls with Fred Alvey's film collection