Fownhope Local’s Rewind and enjoy an afternoon of Herefordshire Archive Films


Amanda Huntley of The Huntley Film Archives addresses the audience at Fownhope Memorial Village Hall

 

On Wednesday, 9th March the Fownhope Local History Group, one of the Full Circle Project’s participating groups took part in hosting one of the screenings for Rewind Festival 2011. The event which took place at Fownhope Memorial Village Hall featured a screening of “rare archive film featuring Herefordshire and Shropshire from 1900 onwards.”

The venue was packed to the rafters with around 115 in attendance who came from all over Herefordshire with some also travelling as far as Wales to reminisce of times gone by, watching footage of local events caught on film some 60 and some 70 or more years ago. The screening featured some fabulous material from  Huntley’s Commercial Film Archive Collection with some footage estimated to date back to the early 1900s.

“REWIND, the community film archive project from Flicks in the Sticks in collaboration with Huntley Film Archives is delighted to present this extraordinary programme, the result of a year long research, at venues in Herefordshire and Shropshire in February and March. Volunteers have been trained as film archivists and have catalogued footage from the Huntley Film Archives which brings the past, including some of the sights and sounds of the two counties, to life.”

Highlights of the screening included :

Hereford May Fair in 1910
Tommies march out of the City in 1914
Kington Carnival in the 1920s
Cider making in the 1930s
The old cattle market in the 1940s
Leominster Three Counties Fair in the 1950s.

Following the Rewind Screening which was really brought to life when accompanied by Amanda Huntley’s animated commentry, the audience was treated to home-made cakes and refreshments before settling down for the second half.

The screening of archive material was particularly poignant for one member of the audience who had no recollection that he had even been caught on film as a young lad working the land with fellow Herefordshire farmers over 60 years ago and was able to watch this footage for the first time.

The Fownhope Local History Group Chairman, David Clark, used the occasion as a platform for showing what film collections had been found as part of their group’s involvement with the MACE archive’s,  Heritage Lottery Funded, Full Circle Project. The group have been looking for archive footage relating to Fownhope and the local area for the past 8 months and have been hugely successful in unearthing around 7 collections with more popping their heads up all the time. The event was a chance to show the people of Fownhope and the wider area, the results of the footage that had been digitised with the help of MACE & HLF funding.

It was a fantastic opportunity for myself, Lucie Kerley Curator for Community & Acquisition at MACE and my colleague Catherine English Full Circle’s Cataloguer, to meet the depositors of the film collections in person for the first time and to hear how much joy they and their families had gotten from the collections being digitised. Smiles all round!

Full Circle Depositor Joanne Probert was delighted with the result of her digitised cine collection that has now been seen by many of her relatives living in AustraliaPeter Davies holds his DVD copy of the cinefilm collection that was digitised with the help of the Heritage Lottery Funding received by MACE's Full Circle Project, Peter has also deposited more reels of 8mm film to be digitised and archived at MACEPeter Davies holds his DVD copy of the cinefilm collection that was digitised with the help of the Heritage Lottery Funding received by MACE's Full Circle Project, Peter has also deposited more reels of 8mm film to be digitised and archived at MACE

Midlands We Need Your Home Movies!Screening of Herefordshire based ATV archive footage at Fownhope Memorial Hall

Peter Davies holds his DVD copy of the cinefilm collection that was digitised with the help of the Heritage Lottery Funding received by MACE’s Full Circle Project, Peter has also deposited more reels of 8mm film to be digitised and archived at MACE

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The group will continue to look for more moving image materials in their area that are in need of digitising to ensure that this valuable window into their local history is one that is not lost but can long be enjoyed by both our generation and those yet to come.

Tipton Harriers Centenary Celebration embraces nostalgic archive film screening at Reunion Event


On Sunday 10th October 2010 Tipton Harriers past and present were reunited once more to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Tipton Harriers Athletics Club by getting together to reminisce about the many achievements that they had won over the years.
Tipton Harriers Centenary Archivists Chris Holloway and Keith Atkins, who helped organised the reunion event, which took place in the Snug, arranged for an exhibition of memorabilia to adorn the walls and also for a screening of the Tipton Harriers films that had recently been found in the Harriers Full Circle Film Search.
 
The films showed members of the Harriers taking part in cross-country relays and events across the country during the 1960s and 70s.
Tipton Harrier and filmmaker, Tony Phillips, spoke to Lucie Kerley – Curator for Community & Acquisition at MACE (The Media Archive for Central England) about how it felt to watch his footage over 40 years on now that it had been digitised by the MACE archive’s Heritage Lottery Funded Full Circle Project. Also interviewed was Tipton Harrier’s Long Distance Runner, Ron Bentley, who was asked how it felt to watch the interview of himself at his factory in 1974 with ATV presenter Peter Green.
Watch the 1974 interview here: macearchive.org/​Media.html?Title=20607
What are your favourite  Tipton Harrier memories? Do you recognise any of the faces from the film?
To find out more about the Tipton Harrier archive film footage  held at MACE visit our website www.macearchive.org to start your search.
If you have any home-movies relating to the Midlands area please get in touch with us here at MACE to find out about your nearest participating Full Circle Group who are looking for films in your area.
Lucie Kerley – Full Circle Project Curator: Community & Acquisition – 0116 252 5931 or email lk99@le.ac.uk

Interviewed by: Lucie Kerley @luciekerley
Filmed & edited by jmgcreative – jmgcreative.co.uk @jmgcreative
Archive footage supplied by: ATV and MACE (The Media Archive for Central England) macearchive.org @MACEarchive
Music by: Boat to Row – myspace.com/​boattorow

Camera: Canon 550D DSLR
Lens: 50mm f1.8, 10mm-24mm
Glidetrack

Edited using Final Cut Pro and graded using Color

Belbroughton History Society visit MACE archive to see the Full Circle Project’s cinefilm digitisation process.


 

Sarah and John from Belbroughton History Society visit the MACE archive

Merry Christmas Midlands from MACE’s Full Circle Project!

Over the past 6 months we have collected nearly 50 collections as part of the Full Circle Project’s search for Midlands home-movies! It has been a truly phenomenal response to an appeal for members of the midlands communities to search through their attics and dig out any old cinefilm or home -movies they may have stashed away.

As part of the project we are working alongside around 60 community groups from across the Midlands to search for these hidden gems. On Tuesday we had the pleasure of a visit from Sarah and John, members of Belbroughton History Society http://www.belbroughton.com/History.htm. They had expressed an interest in seeing what happens once the cine-film that has been found during their Full Circle Film search comes to the archive. It was a great day and we were able to explain the different procedures that the films must go through before they are copied and transferred into a digital format which the depositors and groups and members of the public can then enjoy watching for years to come.

When film initially comes to MACE it  has to be assessed – the film collection and it’s containers will be inspected for titles or any other give away information to see if  there is anything of particular social/historical relevance or value to the Midlands region.

Cinefilm collection

An accession number is then allocated  to each item in the collection –  e.g. 001/2010/020  – and this is then logged onto the MACE Accession log  along with the date the film came in, the date it was accessioned, the depositors name & address, quantity, gauge and whether a personal file has been set up and a deposit agreement signed.

We then create a receipt listing of all the film titles in the collection, including any related materials that people wish to deposit – such as projectors, viewers or splicers. This receipt is then printed and sent out to the depositor/donator who owns the collection and also to the participating Full Circle Group to keep for their own records.

The receipt is also placed in their depositor/donator/owner’s personal file which is held at MACE alongside a copy of their signed donation agreement and any other information about the titles in the collection.

Any films that are in the collection that are deemed appropriate and  need to be copied will then be prepared for copying: new white spacer is placed at the beginning and end of the reel and any torn perforations are repaired.  So for example, if there are a number of smaller 50ft reels in the collection these will be transferred onto one large 400ft reel to enable the transfer process to be faster and more efficient.

Once the films are prepared a new entry is created in the MACE catalogue for each title in the collection, so that they will appear searchable on the MACE website: www.macearchive.org, at this stage there is no video clip attached to the catalogue entry.

The film collection then has to be put onto a priority copying list which MACE’s Full Circle Technician Andrew Jenkins then works his way through. Using the Flash Scan and Flash Transfer equipment purchased with Heritage Lottery Fund grant, awarded to the project which will run until March 2013,  we are able to convert  a number of film gauges: Standard 8mm, Super 8mm, 9.5mm, and 16mm cinefilm. We also have the equipment to transfer other moving image formats such as: Beta SP, 1 inch tape, D2, Mini-DV & DV-cam.

MACE's Full Circle Technician Andrew Jenkins

The transfer process can take some time, as films are copied in real time and any adjustments to colour, saturation, white balance and exposure also have to be considered during this time. Once the original material has been transferred into a digital format, an archival copy LTO tape is made and also a viewing copy.

Andrew then trims the footage to make sure that the clips appear as they should do once they are on burnt to a DVD. The owner (depositor/donator) and the Full Circle Participating Group can then choose to have a DVD of the material which will be playable on the majority of DVD players or they can have an editable version – should they wish to compile their own screenings of the material found for public viewing.  Our cataloguer Catherine then looks through the material and keywords it as thoroughly as possibly to make sure that each title is accessible by members of the public. Eventually all material found during the Full Circle Project will be viewable online – on the www.macearchive.org website. Please visit our website if you require any more information about how to care for your cinefilm, or contact us here at MACE on 0116 252 5066 and we will be happy to help.

Full Circle Project - A public screening of archive material from the MACE archive.

If you know of anyone who has a film collection that deserves preserving, please get in touch with Full Circle Curator: Lucie Kerley on 0116 252 5931 or email lk99@le.ac.uk.  If you are a local history or community group wishing to take part in the Full Circle Project and are interested in searching for old cinefilm in your area – please get in touch.

Photographs courtesy of Lucie Kerley.

Full Circle Project Curator Lucie Kerley speaks to Talk About Local’s Nicky Getgood about search for Home-movies!


Video interview by Nicky Getgood – Talk About Local & Digbeth is Good. Nicky also runs an Irish Filum night at The Spotted Dog Pub.

Pat Keeling Leicester Model Agency’s Film Collection arriving in January!


 

The Pat Keeling Leicester Model Agency Collection

Pat Keeling started her modeling career in 1969 when the hosiery industry in Leicester was buoyant and tights had just come into fashion with the launch of the mini skirt.

 Pat says. “At the time Leicester was at its peak in the  hosiery industry and because I had a good pair of legs I ended up on the cover of packs of tights and stockings – Pretty Polly, Elle and Christian Dior”.

Things really took off in 1972 when she became the BBC’s Golden Girl and this opened the door for many radio, TV and personal appearances. Her modeling assignments took her as far afield as Iran and in 1973 she came third in the Miss UK contest. Other titles followed, including Miss Leicester City FC in 1974.


Realising that a model’s life was limited, Pat started her own modeling agency in Leicester in 1977. While still taking on modeling assignments, she now focused on the agency. The agency’s reputation for professionalism and excellence grew.

Highlights of Pat’s collection include Fantastic fashion shows  which were produced for the Leicester Mercury at De Montfort Hall throughout the 80’s and 90’s featuring local Leicester people. The agency choreographed and produced  shows for Next plc, George, Adams Kids, John Lewis, BHS, Mothercare, Tesco, Matalan and The Clothes Show Live, to name but a few. .

Photographic work for models of all ages from babies to pensioners and promotions throughout the UK were and still are everyday business.

MACE are looking forward to receiving this collection in January.

Pat Keeling Model Agency – 38 Northgate Street, Leicester, LE3 5BY. Tel: 0116 262 2540 Fax: 0116 253 7712

http://www.patkeelingagency.co.uk/

Home Movies are just so fashionable right now!


MACE and Full Circle are delighted at the level of publicity and exposure The Great British Home Movie Roadshow series, currently being aired on BBC Two, is generating. It truly highlights just how important it is that we find these previously unseen amateur films, home movies and records of British life and ensure that they are preserved for future generations. The Home Movie Roadshow offers a fascinating insight into the important role that Moving Image Materials have played in our lives over the past century.

With funding from the Heritage Lottery the Full Circle project aims to work alongside Local History Societies & Community groups in both East & West Midlands and help them undertake searches for hidden film, tape or video that may be stowed away in their community. So far the project has gathered interest from a number of sources, such as the BBC, Derby QUAD, Dudley Archives & Rural Media, to name but a few,  and has attracted groups from as far a field as Mansel Lacy and Fownhope, Herefordshire in the West Midlands, all the way over to the East coast to places like Woodhall Spa and Mablethorpe, in Lincolnshire. The Full Circle project,  aims to seek out film relating to the screen heritage of the Midlands and  preserve this in order to make this film accessible to members of the community to enjoy for years to come.

Should you have any Midlands related film stowed away in your attic that you wish to discuss, please get in touch with Full Circle Senior Curator: Kay Ogilvie at kay.ogilvie@tiscali.co.uk or 01629 823495

The Media Archive for Central England, also known as MACE, is an independent limited company and registered charity. It is the public sector regional film and video archive for the East and West Midlands.  Based at the University of Leicester we are part of a network of public moving image archives that collectively preserve the UK’s moving image heritage. We are also an integral part of the network of public archives and record offices across the Midlands.

Our aims are to collect, document, preserve, and subsequently provide access to the moving image heritage of the East and West Midlands. In addition we provide an information service to help people who are looking for film as well advice on how to care for moving image materials outside the archive.

“For a 100 years the British have filmed their own lives on their own cameras. What four generations have shot shows a totally different story to all the official film. It’s buried treasure, lying unseen, forgotten in thousands of attics and top draws. A priceless archive that must be saved. This is a 100 years of Britain’s Home Movies.” Excerpt from the BBC Two Home Movie Roadshow.

If  you want to hear more about the program or you have missed an episode, you can catch up and watch online using the BBC iPlayer here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00tc4qn

The next episode of the Home Movie Roadshow is on tomorrow, Friday, 20th August at  21:00 on BBC Two.

Episode 3

3/5. In Falmouth the team see a unique record of National Service in the 50s.